How people’s cultural values and community participation contribute to positive conservation of wetlands

We are pleased to announce the recent publication of a new report ‘World Heritage and Ramsar Conventions: Converging Towards Success, which is the result of a collaboration between the Ramsar Convention Secretariat and the UNESCO World Heritage Centre, with the support of the Ramsar Culture Network as well as CEPA colleagues.

This report examines how cultural values and community participation contribute to positive conservation outcomes in exceptional wetland areas with dual World Heritage and Ramsar status. Six case studies from around the world illustrate the challenges – and successes – of integrating both nature and culture in the management of internationally designated wetlands, including in the Okavango Delta (Botswana), Mont-Saint-Michel (France), Wood Buffalo (Canada), Banc d’Arguin (Mauritania), Sian Ka’an (Mexico) and Itsukushima Shinto Shrine (Japan). ‘Lessons learned’ from experiences at these outstanding wetlands are intended to support both site managers and broader policy-makers in making the most of the powerful role that cultural values and community participation can play in wetland conservation and wise use.

MAVA has been the main supporter of the Ramsar Culture Network since its creation. We acknowledge the deep link between the cultural and natural dimensions of wetlands, and we believe in the power of nurturing cultural values and practices of natural wetlands to secure their long-term conservation.

Click here to download the report.

Previous post

Back

Next post